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Copyright A Collection of Songs? Advice Appreciated

#51 User is offline   zmulls Icon

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 03:24 PM

If that's THE Barbara Cloyd, don't let the "Muse in Training, 4 posts" fool you. Barbara Cloyd is very plugged in to Nashville and the songwriting community, and is an authoritative voice. She speaks from years of experience. (Have not had the pleasure of meeting her in person, have only swapped a couple of e-mails).

Yes, when I was a newbie I was very paranoid about stuff getting stolen, and copywrited a couple collections. I don't run to do that anymore. However I don't post stuff online as much because I'm usually writing (when I'm writing) *with* or *for* someone and that work stays between me and whomever as long as it's a going project.
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#52 User is offline   feegis Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 08:14 AM

Quote

Barbara, we tell newbies this all the time, but they come to this site convinced that their songs are going to be stolen.

Neal


Iím always intrigued by the feel of your responses, Neal. I understand why you think itís not necessary. Iím not trying to justify why I register, as much as addressing what I see as a position that doesnít consider any other reason someone may.

Is it the general belief of this board that "The Muse's Muse" is every new member's first exposure to songwriting and music? That no one has any experience or knowledge prior to joining The Muse's Muse? That no one has any other compelling reason to register that might be personal to them and that they don't understand their own motivations for doing so?

Neal, have you ever had some yahoo try to lay claim to work you had done? In anything, not just music. If it happens once, you take precautions. I understand the music industry is its own animal with its own mechanics, its own policies, procedures, protocol, whatever. But the notion of an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure is an elemental force that is transcendent.

I gave a handful of lyrics to an acquaintance of mine a few years ago. This guy was the SC state flatpicking champion when he was 19. He was in the band of a recording / touring artist out of Nashville (who won a Grammy for producing, as well). He has pretty strong, active connections in Nashville. He'd been invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry. He's an accomplished musician.

Anyway, he completed one of my lyrics, which I heard him perform, and he was working on the others. I haven't talked to him in at least two years now, but if I happened to hear he had completed another and was performing it, it would get my attention. Would I think it was going to be a "Huge Hit?" No, itís not about that. Would I think he was stealing it? No, not him. Would I feel uncomfortable if someone, especially with his connections, was doing anything with work I'd done without telling me that I couldn't lay claim to? Yep. That's just me. Could it happen that he just took it as his own? Of course it could. It's been stated that no publisher would move forward without having clearance. Well, if I don't have it registered, he could register it himself. Now he has the registration. I'm not concerned about him doing that, but it could happen. Ounce of prevention..... A second after the fact is a second too late.

The point is, and I know Mark doesnít think a lyric is worth anything on its own, but the fact is, a lyric can be written independently of music. If that lyric gets put to music, it becomes a song. If that song is good enough, it gets demoed, if the demo is good enough, maybe it gets picked up. If it gets picked up, maybe it gets onto a CD. If that happens, then clearly that lyric was good enough when it was written. If it were mine, I would want to make sure my interests are protected. Even if it's just someone playing the song at a bar, someone saying they like it (and people can like a song for the lyric), and knowing I can back it up if it came to it. Absurd? Maybe, but we all have our own different experiences that lead to our mindsets.

Again, I wrote a children's book. Dare I say it's not too bad? I submitted it to publishers. Would you recommend I do so without registering? That's my creation. I'm not taking a chance of being unprotected when it's a fairly cheap, simple procedure to do so. A personal tradeoff everyone gets to choose for their own personal reason. I understand that upstanding, legitimate members in the publishing world know better than to try to steal someoneís work. I'm not talking about them. I'm talking about the idiots, the fact that screwy things happen, and that copyright laws exist for a reason.


Best Regards,
Feegis

#53 User is offline   Neal K Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 12:45 PM

View Postfeegis, on 12 September 2011 - 06:14 AM, said:

Neal, have you ever had some yahoo try to lay claim to work you had done? In anything, not just music.


Yes, I have. I own a company which, in turn, owns some patents and trademarks. Some of these are used -- stolen, if you will -- by other companies and organizations. What you are not understanding is the cost of taking legal action and the slim odds of getting any compensation after the legal fees are paid. What I'm saying is, it doesn't matter if you pay for official copyright registration. If your song is "stolen" and the thief makes substantial money on it, you'll never see a dime of it unless you have your own legal department like the record companies do.

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#54 User is offline   FunkDaddy Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 01:16 PM

View Postfeegis, on 12 September 2011 - 09:14 AM, said:

The point is, and I know Mark doesnít think a lyric is worth anything on its own


True.

Quote

If that happens, then clearly that lyric was good enough when it was written.


The lyric wasn't good enough until I, or another similarly angelic-voiced singer/songwriter, came along and added music to it :)

Like I said, you want to copyright lyrics, go for it, but it's ultimately pointless and a waste of money, in my opinion.
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#55 User is offline   feegis Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 05:07 PM

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The lyric wasn't good enough until I, or another similarly angelic-voiced singer/songwriter, came along and added music to it

I'm hip! :)

But, seriously, once that happens, don't you think the person that contributed the lyrics would want to protect their contribution? If you write a lyric and I put it to music, maybe without telling you, and then register the whole thing under my name, are you saying that would not bother you at all on any level for any reason? Yes, it only matters if something happens with it, but by the time something happens with it, it's already too late. I don't think people go around stealing other peoples' stuff. It's just that screwy things happen.

Mark, I'm guessing in the whole "What's more important, lyrics or music" argument, you go with lyrics? :P (no, I know you would most likely say it takes good lyrics with good music to make a good song.)


Quote

What you are not understanding is the cost of taking legal action and the slim odds of getting any compensation after the legal fees are paid. What I'm saying is, it doesn't matter if you pay for official copyright registration. If your song is "stolen" and the thief makes substantial money on it, you'll never see a dime of it unless you have your own legal department like the record companies do.


I'm not sure why you think I don't understand that, Neal, when my whole point is that your point above is not my point. I just don't feel comfortable not doing it. It's pretty much as simple as that. I've presented a number of scenarios to make points rooted in the notion that screwy things can happen, but the bottom line for me is that I just don't feel comfortable not doing it. And, I do want to be able to demonstrate that I wrote what I wrote to anyone who might question it. Maybe that's absurd, but, like I said, to each his own.

But you know what? If something like above did happen, I'd sure feel better having a registration than not having a registration. Without it, then you really, really have no chance. I can tell you, if it did happen, I sure as hell wouldn't just sit on my hands and say, "Oh, well. You can't fight the machine." And it still seems that if the song was that successful, and you could demonstrate that it's yours, that a lawyer would be interested in at least looking at it for a reasonable fee. I admit I do not have first-hand experience or knowledge with that aspect, but I would at least try to take them to task so as not to let someone try to lay claim to something they didn't do. That's a real issue with me. Call it an idiosyncrasy. Heck, call it whatever you want. :)


But, again, I ask: Would it be the recommendation that I submit my children's book to publishers without having it registered? It's already registered, but would it be the recommendation to submit without registration? I just couldn't imagine doing that.

I do realize that I've kind of been going around and around with this, so I'll be done with it. I now think I have said everything I can possibly say about my position on this topic.

Best Regards,
Feegis

#56 User is offline   Neal K Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 07:22 PM

View Postfeegis, on 12 September 2011 - 03:07 PM, said:

Would it be the recommendation that I submit my children's book to publishers without having it registered? It's already registered, but would it be the recommendation to submit without registration? I just couldn't imagine doing that.


Well, I wouldn't bother with it, but you obviously did - and that's ok. Like you said, it's a matter of personal comfort. But there's nothing wrong with laying the facts out and letting people decide for themselves.

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#57 User is offline   Lazz Icon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 08:49 PM

Lazz said:

Registration does not give you protection or insurance - what is gives you is registration - which can be useful.
Earlier in the thread you said you understood these significant differences quite clearly.
Yet you continue to speak as if something other were the case - and this confuses me.

Hip Pocket Music

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and the second best to sing them"

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ďSONG is the joint art of words and music, two arts under emotional pressure coalescing into a third.
The relation and balance of the two arts is a problem that has to be resolved anew in every song that is composed.Ē

The Encyclopedia Britannica

#58 User is offline   feegis Icon

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 10:21 AM

Quote

But there's nothing wrong with laying the facts out and letting people decide for themselves.


Absolutely.

I really don't mean to go on as long as I do. With that said..............


Quote

Lazz said:


Registration does not give you protection or insurance - what is gives you is registration - which can be useful.
Earlier in the thread you said you understood these significant differences quite clearly.
Yet you continue to speak as if something other were the case - and this confuses me.


Yeah, my perspective on things has probably changed throughout this whole thread. Though, I do believe you think I don't understand things that are not the issue for me.

I know you say I persist in saying foolish things. Bottom line, for me, it's simply about a nominal cost for a certain degree of comfort when I make things public, and maybe I haven't yet been convinced that it doesn't matter.

However, it does seem that you think that I have a lack of understanding of what US copyright registration does, what it means, what it is. That doing it can be a good thing, but that I don't understnad why I do it. Do you think I believe registration does something specific for me, as if I think it makes my lyrics more important? As if I have the US Copyright office on the lookout for me for anyone using my stuff, or that people check with the US Copyright Office to see if that idea has been used already and keeps them from doing the same? That it opens doors and paves the way to making millions? That if the scheming underworld of the music industry snags my lyrics on their never ending troll for unsuspecting fool's lyrics, then I get a reimbursement check? You don't think that, do you? If you say I don't understand the odds of anything materializing in the way they might materialize, and, then, in turn, the costs of recovering anything, then I would say I'm not making my point clearly. But I'll admit, my point comes from something personal rather than industry ways, though it's probably meandered a bit.

I realize that the more purposeful copyright infringements would be, say, if some company tried to use Springsteen's Born To Run in a running shoe commercial without his consent. Or Kid Rock putting All Summer Long on an album without Lynyrd Skynyrd's permission. But if you've ever had someone try to lay claim to your work, you tend to take precautions, even if the odds of anything happening are four bazzilion to one. But even if I walked into a garage party and some unsigned, weekend band was playing a song with my lyric (which is possible) and the singer says, "Here's a song I wrote", I simply want to possess the knowledge that I can propose they didn't write it all and that I can back it up with something if it came to it. I know the registration doesn't get me anything other than a record that I had it registered. Meaningful? To me, yes. That's not to say I run around with copyright certificates and wave them in peoples' faces.

I don't know why this thread has me so engaged.


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And place my mark on another man's dreams


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#59 User is offline   Lazz Icon

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 10:58 AM

feegis said:

Do you think I believe registration does something specific for me, as if I think it makes my lyrics more important? As if I have the US Copyright office on the lookout for me for anyone using my stuff, or that people check with the US Copyright Office to see if that idea has been used already and keeps them from doing the same? That it opens doors and paves the way to making millions? That if the scheming underworld of the music industry snags my lyrics on their never ending troll for unsuspecting fool's lyrics, then I get a reimbursement check? You don't think that, do you?


My dearest Feegis - I have little idea what you think other than what you write.

I know that you believe registration to be important to you - and that you act accordingly.
All well and good.

What confuses me is your repeated rationale using words like 'protection', 'insurance', 'prevention'.
I have no issues with you doing what you think is right with your own stuff, I just have problems with magical thinking.

feegis said:

I realize that the more purposeful copyright infringements would be, say, if some company tried to use Springsteen's Born To Run in a running shoe commercial without his consent. Or Kid Rock putting All Summer Long on an album without Lynyrd Skynyrd's permission.

Such permission would only be required if the artist had made their retention of 'moral rights' explicit - otherwise the rights owners are allowed to license their work to whoever they choose - the contractual norm in the US is for artists to waive those rights.

feegis said:

I don't know why this thread has me so engaged.

Me neither.
Hip Pocket Music

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and the second best to sing them"

Hillaire Belloc

ďSONG is the joint art of words and music, two arts under emotional pressure coalescing into a third.
The relation and balance of the two arts is a problem that has to be resolved anew in every song that is composed.Ē

The Encyclopedia Britannica

#60 User is offline   feegis Icon

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 12:33 PM

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I have no issues with you doing what you think is right with your own stuff, I just have problems with magical thinking.

I know you don't. I know no one really cares whether I register. But I don't understand where you are getting "magical" thinking. Please explain "magical". (I do realize it's not a compliment).

I think I may have embarrassed myself by going on so much, and, seemingly, for being a naive newbie, but I still don't see what is so preposterous about my scenarios. I am more of a realist than a dreamer. In fact, that's probably why I take the position I take. I have seen what happens when you leave yourself exposed.

If my children's book was picked up by a publisher, apparently that would be the time to register. But, if it was good enough to be picked up and protected after, then it's good enough to be protected beforehand. No? Why does that not make sense? Since we don't know, error on the side of caution, no?

I'm not saying S*** happens all the time, but it does happen.

Lazz, maybe you can enlighten me as to the exact reason someone would ever register their work. Keep in mind, I believe protection, which is the basis of copyright registration, is most effective at the point when something becomes viable. Any song whose lyric was written independently of the music, which does happen, is clearly part of the song, thus being viable when it was written. Who knows what happens from there. So, why not be prepared?

#61 User is offline   Roger Icon

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 05:29 PM

View Postfeegis, on 13 September 2011 - 11:33 AM, said:

Quote

I have no issues with you doing what you think is right with your own stuff, I just have problems with magical thinking.

I know you don't. I know no one really cares whether I register. But I don't understand where you are getting "magical" thinking. Please explain "magical". (I do realize it's not a compliment).

I think I may have embarrassed myself by going on so much, and, seemingly, for being a naive newbie, but I still don't see what is so preposterous about my scenarios. I am more of a realist than a dreamer. In fact, that's probably why I take the position I take. I have seen what happens when you leave yourself exposed.

If my children's book was picked up by a publisher, apparently that would be the time to register. But, if it was good enough to be picked up and protected after, then it's good enough to be protected beforehand. No? Why does that not make sense? Since we don't know, error on the side of caution, no?

I'm not saying S*** happens all the time, but it does happen.

Lazz, maybe you can enlighten me as to the exact reason someone would ever register their work. Keep in mind, I believe protection, which is the basis of copyright registration, is most effective at the point when something becomes viable. Any song whose lyric was written independently of the music, which does happen, is clearly part of the song, thus being viable when it was written. Who knows what happens from there. So, why not be prepared?



Copyright does not inherently provide protection, maybe that's not the word you mean to use but you've repeated it several times. Copyright for unrecorded, unpublished works is a waste of money, primarily due to the fact that the possibility of your work being infringed is so remote, and the volume of work you may generate in total relative to the amount of work you generate that is 'commercially viable' is disproportionate. Copyrights only truly become 'protection' after a work is released, and that's why (to Barbara's earlier point) most music publishers don't even file them until after a song is recorded, sometimes even after it is released. There are cheaper, more effective ways of protecting your work if you feel paranoid about it...for example, the songwriting software program MasterWriter provides a song registration service that gives an electronic 'water mark' to your date of creation, and is every bit as effective as filing a copyright (will also hold up equally well in court, if not better). As an example, I wrote a song in 1986 that wasn't released until 1997. The copyright was filed in '97, but I have paperwork such as the original lyric sheet with a DOC, and demo billing records that prove the creation date of the song as '86 - that information would therefore render the copyright date null and void in as far as establishing a creation date.

In nearly 30 years as a staff writer in Nashville, I've had close to 2,500 songs published, but only somewhere between 120-150 recorded and released, and most pro writers work at about that average (songs written to songs recorded). So spending the money to copyright every song I've written would just be foolish. If it makes you feel better to do it, knock yourself out, but I'm reminded of a story I've heard repeated on Music Row a lot. A famous writer was speaking to a stranger at a bar, and when the stranger realizes he's speaking with a hit writer, he says "you know, I've written a handful of songs that are smashes...absolute, undeniable #1 songs." The songwriter, intrigued, says "oh really? Have you been pitching them?", and the stranger says "oh hell no, I don't play these songs for ANYBODY! Somebody might STEAL them!" Point being, sometimes worrying about remote possibilities is a self-defeating exercise.

#62 User is offline   feegis Icon

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:01 PM

Thanks for the thoughtful response, Roger.


I use the word protection because protection is the basis of registration in its most basic form. What else is it? What one word would be better to explain why anyone would ever register at any point or status of a song's existence? I use it based on any possible scenario.

(regarding an earlier post, as far as insurance, no, I don't think it's like car insurance, where if someone steals my lyric, I get reimbursed. As far as prevention, no, I don't think registration prevents anything from happening. Though, if someone does make an infringement claim which is upheld, the infringers are prevented from doing so).

But what about this:

I wrote a lyric for a song that was entered into the ISC. However, my name was not on it when it was entered. The musician who contributed to the music recorded it and sent it in himself. It didn't matter that it didn't win. It didn't matter that it was never cut. We were entering to win, so, of course, you entertain that it might, but he jumped in front of me, and I didn't like the feeling at all. If he's a giant a$$ who refuses to acknowledge my contribution, then where does that leave me if the song had won? The prizes for the ISC would be nice, but so would the recognition for someone who was trying to make a name for themselves. Would it take a whole legal department to go against one individual guy? I imagine it would have been pretty easy if I put a lawyer on him, and I imagine the lawyer would have been more inclined had I had registration.

The problem here, I think, is that the perception of some people posting here believe that the so called newbies are all blinded by Nashville Lights dreams and a fear of Kenny Chesney stealing their lyric. It doesn't have to be that big to matter. When I say protection, at my stage, I'm just talking about protection of my peace of mind, though I still say protection is an appropriate word overall.

Best Regards,
Feegis

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:03 PM

Also, to add to Roger's point about other forms of protection, if your work is at all "viable" (I like that word in this context, feegis :D ) then you should be registered with a PRO, with your work consequently registered with them.

I do believe SOCAN registers their members music (because, let me reiterate, a lyric without music is a car without an engine) for free. I'm sure ASCAP and BMI do the same.

EDIT: You posted as I was typing...in that scenario above feegis, with the ISC, you should have documentation of all agreements with your co-writer, whether or not you planned to enter the competition. I trust all the people I've collaborated with, but that doesn't mean I haven't documented all our e-mails and what not about the song.
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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:06 PM

Quote

(I like that word in this context, feegis )


Thanks, Mark. You have NO IDEA how pleased I am to get that feedback!! :) I feel like I've worked so hard, so very, very hard!! :lol:

I'm joking, of course, but I do appreciate it, and thanks for the advice.

Best Regards,
Feegis

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 08:23 AM

View Postfeegis, on 05 June 2011 - 06:44 PM, said:

Quote

feegis, the point is, "Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer" isn't a song until it has a melody. It gets NO profits until it has the melody. So why bother copyrighting the lyric? Like jonie said, it makes no sense to copyright anything until it's in a profitable (?) form. Does it hurt? Nope. But it's a waste of money if you ask me.


OK - a scenario. Let's say you wrote "Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer" - or something like it - as a poem. You submit it to a poetry contest. Some contest judge takes it, gives it to a struggling musician friend, and says it might make a fun song. That musician takes it, puts it to a fun melody, and sends it to a producer friend (or someone with connections) who markets it. The thing catches fire, and you hear your poem being sung all over the radio.

Not possible?

Yes - I am painfully aware that the odds are long - that point does not have to be made again. But is it possible? Is there more than one reason copyright laws exist to begin with? A scenario such as this doesn't even have to be done in an underhanded manner. It could be just an honest mistake made by unaware people. Are you telling me there's NO way this could happen, and, if it did, that you wouldn't say, "Hey.....wait a minute! Those are my words!"?

The annals of art are filled with people who tried and tried and tried and tried before they finally hit on something. You never know when it's going to come or what it might be. The fact that the odds are so long is the very reason to do it. Let's say your one in a billion shot comes along, something screwy happens, and you weren't covered. How sickening would that be? This is not a lesson you'd have to learn more than once, but it's not a lesson you have to learn the hard way, either. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure - you just don't always anticipate needing the cure until you're kicking yourself for being so foolish. You donít want to lose your one in a billion chance.

I owned a cash business for four years, and I implemented all the typical security measures. My employees once asked me if I didn't trust them. I told them that I didn't suspect any one of them of stealing, but if I wasn't wary of employee theft, I'd be opening the door to it - because people are people, and people can get desperate or just too weak to do what's right.

So, all I can say to those on this board who aren't writing stuff that's worth stealing - keep writing, keep striving, and don't get discouraged. It's not easy, but it can happen. Be prepared when it does.



AND THE WINNER IS.......!!!! DING, DING, DING, DING<<<<<<<<

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 04:05 PM

View PostHoboSage, on 02 May 2012 - 09:02 PM, said:

That is absolutely correct. But, in my opinion, registering that way instead of registering each song separately may not always be a good idea. Why? Because, if you register your songs as a collective work, then you run the risk of having each of those songs being considered as part of compilation, which could mean that every one of those songs could be infringed, but you could only recover damages for ONE infringement of the compilation.


Can you expand on this? You're saying if a work that is copyrighted as part of a collection is infringed upon more than once, you can only recover damages for one of those infringements? I'm not the lawyer but that doesn't sound right.

Or is it that all the songs in a copyrighted collection can be infringed but the court would see it as one infringement of one work? Again...that just doesn't sound right but I'm far from a lawyer.
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#67 User is offline   Roger Icon

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 05:58 PM

View PostFunkDaddy, on 06 May 2012 - 03:05 PM, said:

View PostHoboSage, on 02 May 2012 - 09:02 PM, said:

That is absolutely correct. But, in my opinion, registering that way instead of registering each song separately may not always be a good idea. Why? Because, if you register your songs as a collective work, then you run the risk of having each of those songs being considered as part of compilation, which could mean that every one of those songs could be infringed, but you could only recover damages for ONE infringement of the compilation.


Can you expand on this? You're saying if a work that is copyrighted as part of a collection is infringed upon more than once, you can only recover damages for one of those infringements? I'm not the lawyer but that doesn't sound right.

Or is it that all the songs in a copyrighted collection can be infringed but the court would see it as one infringement of one work? Again...that just doesn't sound right but I'm far from a lawyer.



I hate to throw David under the bus here, but he is incorrect on this point (in regards to copyrights in the U.S., laws in Canada & elsewhere may be slightly different). Publishing companies routinely file copyrights on multiple songs - it would financially absurd to file them individually. As I've mentioned on other threads, I've had close to 3,000 songs published and somewhere between 100-150 cuts. That would equate to over $100,000 just in copyright filing fees. They typically file them by writer (in other words, all the songs on the form would have been written by one of their staff writers & possibly cowriters).

Entertainment law is very different than other types of law, and there are a great many contractual points & points of law that are "industry standard" that would be considered suspect or unusual in other businesses, but are common practice in entertainment/music law. You can make the argument that a copyright is a type of protection, but it is NOT infallible and/or fail-safe. I have seen many cases where an infringement case was lost by the party holding the copyright because the plaintiff was able to prove an earlier creation date (as well as access to their work by the defendant and sufficient similarity). Proof of date of creation is the most important piece of protection you can have, and that can be done by digital timestamp - programs like MasterWriter & other songwriting software have this type of feature.

I'm also personally aware of over a dozen songs that were HITS, as long ago as 1985, that have never had copyright paperwork filed. It is much more common than you might think.

If you feel compelled to shell out $35 for every song you write, that is certainly your choice. I view it as a galactic waste of resources, especially if you are meticulous in documenting your DOCs (date of creations). The odds of getting ripped off are ridiculously small, especially if you are dealing with legitimate entities in the business (Universal, SonyBMG, etc.). Almost every writer I know goes out of his/her way to AVOID listening to unpublished, unsigned writers' songs, myself included. Not only do I never want to intentionally infringe on someone's work, I take the additional caution of making sure I don't do so unintentionally (hearing a song, forgetting about it and then writing it months or years later thinking it was my own idea).

Lastly, I'll say this - if you research infringement cases in music, you'll find very few "big" ones, when you consider the volume of artists, records, & songs out there. There have been many that you never heard about and never will, because they were settled before going to court - usually because the defendant had an "oh ****!" moment and realized that they had, in fact, infringed the other work. It's also interesting to know that over 90% of the infringement cases filed in the U.S. wind up being frivolous and without merit.

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 08:35 PM

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In further response to Roger, I will also now add that it won't matter what proof you have that you are the original author of a work being infringed if you can't afford to even win a lawsuit to enforce your copyrights because you foolishly neglected to register your copyrights within 3 months of first publication to ensure you can get statutory damages and attorney fees under the Copyright Act. :)

David


We'll have to agree to disagree. My thoughts & opinions are based on 30 years as a professional writer, and a lot of 1st and 2nd hand knowledge regarding infringement cases (including a frivolous one brought against me).

You're the one with the law degree, so I won't argue law with you. But I WILL argue what is standard industry practice with you as that is MY area of expertise.

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